The Ultimate Guide to Studying Abroad

international students

Living in a foreign country is completely different to a holiday. Instead of visiting the city, you’ll get to actually experience your place of study in the long term. You’ll pick up local knowledge like where to go to people-watch, what tourist traps you should avoid, and how to haggle to get the best deals.

… But Is Studying Abroad Right for You?

Before you go and start flipping through the prospectuses, ask yourself “Why do I want to study abroad?” Is it to learn a foreign language? Is it to network with like-minded people? Or is it to learn from the best in your industry?

Wherever you’re going, you’ll likely experience a different style of teaching and learning, not to mention there’ll be culture shocks and language barriers… but if you think you’re ready to brave them all, then consider this journey, close the books, and break out the suitcases!

1. Destination

It’s a big wide wonderful world out there and your options are pretty much endless. Each course, city, and country offers a unique uni experience; geography, weather, food, culture, and political climate (amongst many other factors) all come into play in helping students like you decide where to study. Therefore, you should choose your destination carefully if you wish to pursue higher education abroad.

2. Funding

Neither travelling nor higher education come cheap, so it’s only reasonable to assume that studying abroad is going to cost a pretty penny – and it does. If you’re not prepared to take out loans, you should check out the grants and scholarships available to you and your preferred course to make it easier on your (mum and dad’s) wallet.

3. Student Visa

Arguably the most notorious part of the study abroad application process. If you’re choosing to stay within Europe, then you probably won’t need a student visa, but if you’re venturing to a foreign continent, then the chances are you’ll be required to apply for a student visa before you can begin your studies abroad. Note that every country has its own requirements, so take a look at their immigration rules for foreign students to prevent you from being visa-less on the day of your flight. Alternatively, you can seek guidance from the international office at your university.

4. Packing

How are you going to fit your entire life into two suitcases? How do people dress in the country you’re travelling to? How many carry-ons are you allowed on your airline? These are only a few of the things you need to know for efficient packing and speedy check-in.

5. Local Customs

Studying and living in a foreign country, especially one where English isn’t the primary language, will certainly force you to get out of your comfort zone, take part in new customs and traditions, and immerse yourself in the local way of life. These experiences will not only help you gain a worldly perspective, but they will also help you set yourself apart on your future CVs. Not to mention all the travel tales you’ll be able to tell when you go home.

The Career Prospects for Students Who Study Abroad

Studying abroad can show a prospective employer that you’re responsible and can cope under pressure outside your comfort zone. You can also prove your organisational skills (because you’ll need a lot of them when you’re travelling and living internationally), communication skills, and no doubt many other applicable skills you’ll gain from your studies abroad. If nothing else, the experience will be a great conversation-starter during a job interview.

We cannot stress enough the importance of international commerce and cooperation these days, and having studied abroad is considered an invaluable asset to any company and organisation that operates on a global scale.

If you’re ready to reap the benefits of studying abroad, then you’ll be interested to learn that some of the world’s best universities can be found in Germany – and you may just find that we have a Uninest residence to accommodate you in the city you choose. For more information, feel free to get in touch!